10/28/14


I don't like that phrase "terrible two's" I hate to even consider any of my kids "terrible", they're great kids and the age of two is another stage they go through like any other - it's just a little different when they can't fully express themselves yet. 

This is our third time going through "the two's" and not to compare but my oldest was easily the princess of temper tantrums. Maybe it's because I was a first time toddler mom, she was my first baby and my first experience at everything that had to do with parenting. Despite our attempts at trying tantrum busters (time out, counting down from 3 etc) or what (sometimes unwanted) advice was given, she was quite the handful. It would take her some time to calm down when she went into a rage.

I remember her throwing a good one at the cash of a busy store. She wanted some bright and fun looking candy and I said no. You can't explain to a toddler that you're on a very tight budget and the diapers in the cart are more important than candy that would rot her baby teeth. She decided as we walked by to grab hold of the rack and pull it with us. The whole thing crashed down, products went flying and everyone in the store stared at us. The staring stops bugging you after a while (embarrassing moments can happen multiple times a day, right moms) but back then it was the most embarrassing thing ever. 

The boy was a quiet toddler, he didn't really start the tantrums until the age of three and even then they were mild. He has always been shy so the worst he could do at a store was cry and not even really cry, sob more or less because mommy doesn't want to visit the toy department because it always results in even more tears when they can't buy toys. He would (and still does) give in to "time out". It always helps to give them and yourself some time to breathe and chill out.

Now my youngest is about to turn two in December. She has been having tantrums when she doesn't like something, is tired or whatever her reason may be since she started to become more mobile. It's mostly caused by frustration, not being able to completely express herself yet and trying new ways to see what works and what doesn't.  It's not hard to defuse a fit but once she starts, be prepared!

She's at the stage where she wants to do what she wants to do and that is it. After bath she would rather run around naked through her siblings rooms than put on a diaper and warm PJ. When she doesn't want something in her crib like a certain teddy bear or a blanket, she will launch it over the bars onto the floor. She's not terrible, she's just testing the waters. 

Her ultimate favourite word as of late is "NO". I made a little video to show you - she's still cute when she says it though so you can't really do much but try not to laugh. 



This is far from a tantrum or fit of any kind, she was just in disagreement. I have yet to have enough time to be able to video a full blown tantrum but even if I did have time to do that, who wants to watch a kid having a fit right. We all have enough of our own without listening to someone else's. 

What I have learned throughout my parenting years is that fighting or arguing with a toddler is a lost battle no matter what you say. There are ways to change their minds or persuade them to cooperate but let's face it - when a toddlers mind is made, that is it.

Even though all kids go through their stages and she is our youngest of three, we are still constantly learning every day. 

Is your little one going through the toddler years? Even if you've already "been there, done that", share your story in the comments below! :) 


Not a sponsored post. Story, opinions, comments and imaging/video are those of the author. 

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1 comment:

  1. My son Theo is 26 months and 'no' is one of his go-to words. He even says it when he means to say yes. The past week or two he has starting saying yes more often though. Your daughter is adorable.

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