2/17/15


It's hard to believe my oldest daughter is going to be 11 years old this summer. Oh how much she has changed from being a little girl to...wait for it...a full-fledged Tween!

We always say "they grow up so fast" and honestly they do. She has been been going through changes in every way from physically to emotionally. These are fragile times when you sometimes don't know what to say to your tween or how they may react. 

I wasn't even sure at first how to approach such a delicate subject without embarrassing her or making her uncomfortable. I know schools cover this subject somewhat but as a parent it's our duty to talk to our kids no matter what the subject. It won't be the last conversation like this. 

Give them their space, let them ask the questions, answer them and you too will get an some insight into their tween world. The best thing you can do is talk to them and listen to them.

You don't have to be an expert to answer questions. I'm no expert but I am a mom of girls and I am a woman. Talking to my daughter isn't as hard as my mind can make it out to be sometimes. Luckily at this stage my daughter is still very open with me. 

She had no fear asking me about the changes in her body and why she feels how she feels inside. We have had discussions about many a topic including the dreaded period. Not always the most comfortable topic but it is a fact of life. Luckily we will be well stocked up with Always when that time comes. 

These are not exactly subjects I was prepared for on the surface but I answered her questions to the best of my ability and to her maturity level. I feel the more she understands, the less she will feel she is that "different" because as much as a tween/teen can feel different (didn't we all?), they are really all just the same in many ways. 

That my friends, is the best thing we can do. Be open and honest with our teens. Be there for them and if you don't know the answer, talk to a professional like a doctor, nurse or counsellor who can explain it if that's what makes you comfortable. Do what works for you and your tween or teen. 

As a woman, I want my girls to grow to be strong and powerful in their own rights. I will always let them know not to be ashamed about how they look and who they are. They are beautiful. They are tough. They are unique and they do everything "Like a Girl" just how they should.

If you need some good advice about talking to your tween or teen about puberty and more, here are some great conversation starters courtesy of P&G Everyday! 

Posted by AME in participation with the #PGMom program. Products and perks are obtained as part of this affiliation. Comments and opinions are those of the author. 


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10 comments:

  1. I'm still a few years off on the tween thing, especially with my daughter, but I think about it a fair amount. Good advice!

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    1. Thanks for dropping by Lara! There are so many great resources available to help you too! I'm glad you enjoyed my post! :)

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  2. We have an open honest system here too. I have a tween and a teen and we have had the chat many times. My kids know that we can talk about anything without being judgmental.

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    1. I am with you Paula! I believe in open and honest with my kids like I said too. It's good to know they know they have someone to talk to without judgement. Thanks for stopping by!

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  3. We have been open with the kids all along. I think it is better to have an open ended dialogue that can span years, rather than sitting down for "the talk". We answer questions the best we can, and try not to give more information than they need for their ages

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    1. Exactly mamawee! Keeping it open from the start is always the best way. Don't baby it but explain it to their ages. Thanks for stopping by!

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  5. We have been talking the talk with our girls since they were old enough to learn words. First came proper names for body parts and eventually anatomy and sex - just the basics. My oldest are 6 and 8 and I am hopeful that they continue to ask us questions as they are ready. As a former volunteer educator and executive director at Planned Parenthood Ottawa I can tell you that they are a great support for parents who need guidance on all things sexual health and related topics.

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    1. Being open is widely agreed upon! It's good for kids as they get older to know they can trust you and come to you first with any questions. Thanks for letting us know about Planned Parenthood Ottawa and Thanks so much for stopping by AME! :)

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  6. Great tips. Mine are still mini but I agree, starting early is key. No surprises.

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